All talks and trips have been cancelled due to the Coronavirus pandemic.
We are hoping this is a postponement of activities and we hope to run the talks and trips we have planned as soon as it is safe to do so.
skip to Main Content

Having listed the top 10 posts of 2019, I thought I’d list the top 5 posts in the history of the blog.

Coming in at number 1 is the post about Jon Ratcliffe’s talk ‘Unseen Swindon’ at 538 page views, published on May 7 2018, it can be read in full here.

 I’ve included one of Jon’s photos of the David Murray John Tower.

At the second spot is a post entitled ‘Collective Artists with their Work’ and is a series of photos of artists who took part in the first Open Exhibition at the museum. It’s dated December 30 2018 and shows lots of photographs of artists who took part, and has 500 page views. It’s hard to pick just one photo of an artist from this post. Do have a look here at all the photos.

 This is Mia Willis with her painting, she coincidentally walked in to the gallery when I was there, it wasn’t taken on the opening night as most of them were.

In the third place is  a post called ‘Smashing Pots a talk by Mike Yates’ with 441 page views, it was posted on October 18 in 2012 and is of course worth reading, it can be found here.
I’ll use ‘The Pear’ by Mo Jupp as the photo from the talk:

And in fourth place, there’s a post copied from the flyer of Talks and Trips for 2019 with 426 page views. I’ve taken the piece about the talk by Michael Gray to represent that post.

 And finally in fifth place, a post entitled ‘Archaeological Reconstruction Drawings’ a write up of a talk by Jennie Anderson with 366 page views, this post was published on April 30 2017. Jennie debunked the idea that Vikings wore 2 pronged helmets  One important thing is people’s preconception, Jennie said, for instance many people imagine Vikings had 2 pronged helmets as seen on the person below. The audience were asked to draw a Viking and many people drew the helmet with 2 prongs, Jennie was able to trace this back to a drawing made of Vikings made over a hundred years ago which has influenced our idea of what Vikings looked like.

Back To Top